Sunday, December 18, 2005

The science of Lance Armstrong

So Team Discovery did put up their show on the discovery channel! I watched it this weekend, where Lance speaks about his harsh chemo, the endurance training and how his love for the bike only grew with time. I was indeed lucky to see Dr. Craig Nicholas, Lance's oncologist speak of the journey back to life. With a grim hope of less than 40%, Lance's victorious emergence from cancer has indeed brought light to millions. The beauty of Lance's spirit is the natural atletism and the natural sportmanship of life. Fighting cancer, he says, was the toughest race he's won. One of the few people I've read or heard about, who view pain as the mechanism to greater strength...

Monday, December 05, 2005

Not really been as silent as my blog...

I've been away and silent; been occupied in all that life can offer... I can quite say, I've re-lived all of my past of toddlerhood to teenage tantrums to adult complacence these three weeks. I even swapped my sleep-work hours, only to realize how the night is not just for the devil, but even sweet little humans wanting to wriggle away from the monotonicity of the day, or plain my own dislike of the noon-energy. Thankfully, I'm not a born a machine where humans would experiment ways to have me solar-driven...

I had fun too. What I spoke about above can be categorized as the adult-complacence I have sunk into, where I can, but don't wish to adjust to flock of different feather. A stage of complacence where I shamelessly boast of my weaknesses as the uniqueness I can be loved for. Toddlerhood, because I really cried to get what I want.

My silly devil's workshop of a blog: had some intermediate posts I wished to publish, but changed my mind a zillion times inbetween. The "flintoff post" before this one, is one such impulse. I do wish to write more about the man, who is the now Ian Botham of cricket. England loves him for several reasons, but I guess above all for the fact that he belongs with them, and isn't a soccer man playing for madrid.

And I had a killer time learning new domains at work. All this while, I have been in the far-end of chip design where I ran tools to ensure that circuit resistance-capacitances didn't delay signals from reaching their destinations on time, and if circuit lines were reliable enough to not break had they been in Antartica or the Sahara. Now, I am doing work on simulators that test if a circuit behaves functionally right, and if the boolean functions in your circuit are in accordance with theory. This new experience has really filled up the many pieces of my learning jigsaw. And it really gets me closer to comprehending the field of AI, and how Roger Penrose cannot be more right when he says that wires and switches, however complex cannot add up to the human mind...